Job Interviewing: Framing and Contextualizing Information

Conventional wisdom says you should never lie on your resumé or in a job interview, but sometimes it’s the only way you’ll be able to get the new job.    business.financialpost.com
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In the early 1990s, I was the “manager” of a print shop by title – by job function, I was head copy clerk and graphic designer – my one workplace I used a Macintosh instead of a PC.
We had a job ad out for another copy jockey and I had to read about 1,000 resumes for a minimum wage job.
I didn’t actually read them all, because I knew what we were looking for – so all professional people now desperate for even that, were removed from the pile.
Anyone who listed their religion or political activities were also removed, because this was a general public service job and those are private matters that have no place in the workplace – they also will deeply impact how you are perceived by a manager who potentially has differing values.
Anyway, I got it down to a manageable pool of 10 candidates – young people who were taking some classes or just fresh from school and not going to college.
I reviewed the resumes also this way –
Pile 1, : laser printed, well ordered information for relevance and clarity in their cover letter, some layout attempts – so would fully read resume.  (87 of 1,000)
Pile 2.  dot matrix printed or poorly crafted, generic format resumes (the vast majority)
Pile 3. Handwritten  (a few)
then, somewhere in the 900s, I found one that was not on plain white bond and showed strong layout design.
that became pile number 1, bumping “pile 1” to 2 and pushing 3 and the 4s into the recycle bin..
(there was only 1 out 1000)
I interviews several people and one was a Redhaired gal who had moved from Alberta Canada to the Big City of Vancouver in British Columbia.
Her resume was all retail clerking, she was chipper and upbeat and I thought she would make a good fit. I even phoned her references in Alberta – who gave her glowing reviews.
I fired her within the 3 week period allowed to employers, I, as the head clerk, had gotten the store owner and actual marketing manager as he liked to think of himself – to agree.
In the interview, I noticed she had a single earring, which happened to be a lavender crystal.
I said, “About the earring…”
“Oh” her hand jumped up to stroke it and she blushed and started to stammer – “It’s a friendship earring, an exchange student came from Europe and we hosted her and she has the other one.”
“Oh.” I said, smiling. “Did you know Virgina Woolf wrote her first drafts in purple ink?”
“No. I wondered about that.” she trailed off.
“Well, all I was going to say about the earring was, please wear two, the boss is conservative.”
I hired her.
Soon, she began to make positive comments about Hitler on topics not taught in BC schools, but since I was an avid reader, I knew about – although – not with her spin.
I actually intercepted her saying this to a staff member of a client firm who I knew was Jewish.
Her views were partly why she was fired and certainly her expressing them freely at work was not acceptable conduct.
She was also openly homophobic to me and later said she was totally baffled when I mentioned that Woolf woman whoever that was.
There had been another women that my boss wanted me to interview – she’d had experience at a chain copy shop, but had gone back to school for nursing training and was looking for an easy job until she found one in her career path. So I didnt want to hire her.
On her resume, she listed her temple and religious activities – I did caution her that while it made no difference at the shop, she might want to refrain to prevent prejudicing herself. She wasn’t concerned.
So I asked the question “Where do you see yourself in 5 years?”
Confident in her skills and expected to have the job, she laughed and said “married to a rich man!”
“Ah, well, lightening rarely strikes twice eh?”
“I don’t understand” she said.
“The reason we are hiring is because the position we are staffing was vacated by a man who did just that, he met a rich banker man and off into sunset.” I waved as if goodbye.
She stared at me, blinking rather attractive liquid brown eyes in open mouthed horror and a strange palor cast over her latte complexion. She declined the position and left the interview.
Alberta, separated from Texas by Dominion and by Canada’s Charter…..

O canada…..

An online manifesto, believed to have been written by the man who murdered nine black…
news.nationalpost.com
Criminally charged with promoting hatred, he fought a prolonged court battle that lasted as long as he had been teaching
theglobeandmail.com

umm… I am missing the downside of this….they do mean themselves and not taking out others, right?

To hear them tell it, you’d think that folks likes Glenn Beck or Mike Huckabee or others who cry wolf on a daily basis are going to be rounded up and…  churchandstate.org.uk
Norwegians watching news out of Charleston, South Carolina are reminded of another mass shooting, in July 2011. An Oslo newspaper columnist recalls that her colleagues were unequivocol about calling Anders… pri.org
Ernst Zundel has been a leading Holocaust…
archive.adl.org
Canada’s defence minister justifies face-covering ban during citizenship ceremonies using… shariah law?
huffingtonpost.ca
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