International Women’s Day History: Viking Edition

On Oct. 24, 1975, 90% of Icelandic women went on strike, refusing to do any work at their homes or their jobs.

It was the largest demonstration in the nation’s history and shut down the entire country. Airports were closed, schools were closed, and hospitals couldn’t function.

The strike had an immediate and lasting impact.

The following year, Iceland’s Parliament (now half women) passed a law guaranteeing women equal pay and paid maternity leave. Four years later, Iceland elected the world’s first female President. And today, Iceland has the highest gender equality in the world.

'International Women's Day History: 
On Oct. 24, 1975, 90% of Icelandic women went on strike, refusing to do any work at their homes or their jobs. It was the largest demonstration in the nation's history and shut down the entire country.  Airports were closed, schools were closed, and hospitals couldn't function. The strike had an immediate and lasting impact. The following year, Iceland's Parliament (now half women) passed a law guaranteeing women equal pay and paid maternity leave. Four years later, Iceland elected the world's first female President. And today, Iceland has the highest gender equality in the world. 
If you support equality, LIKE our page @[186219261412563:274:US Uncut]!! 

http://bit.ly/1Etu1hO'

 

Allow me to explain something about Iceland:

  When I was in High School, I asked the history teacher about Iceland’s contribution to world war 2. His reply that there was none. I marched him over to the map of the world and pointed to the north … Continue reading

 

Meanwhile …. In Iceland

  Sigrún Björk Ólafsdóttir   Meanwhile… in a village in Iceland.. a new sign has been erected that bans poledancing due to risk of injury. Turns out that 1 year ago, a maiden in the village was into pole fitness … Continue reading

 

 

Iceland is a land of fire; Greenland is disappearing glaciers

  children’s programming for a long time. it was all I could watch the trauma regressed me to a child state so my recovery process has been largely guided by television which makes sense tv is where it all started … Continue reading

 

 

Fey Fairies and Folk Tales: People Power

  folk tales, also called Fairy Tales, are cautionary tales. to not be greedy, to not make deals with magical things, to not piss off witches – but also these stories were to allow people to find a way to … Continue reading

 

Beowulf: represent

    This Canada-Iceland co-production was a really well done movie version.   this Hollywood slicktastic eye candy version was a horrifying story and character mess.

 

 

Feirce Fey Folk

REYKJAVIK, Iceland — In this land of fire and ice, where the fog-shrouded lava fields offer a spooky landscape in which anything might lurk, stories abound of the “hidden folk” – thousands of elves, making their homes in Iceland’s wilderness. … Continue reading

 

 

Eyjafjallajökull might have bought us some cooling time

Eyjafjallajökull seriously. I used to pronounce it Eisenurkel but in the doc I watched yesterday, they anglo’ed the pronunciation to: Iceland is one of the few places where new land is being made. It sits astride the Mid Atlantic Rift … Continue reading

 

From a family of blockade runners

My Grandfather and his cousin took a boat – not this one – across the German Uboat blockade of the United Kingdom during the second European war. They got out of turn owing to illness and on a run that … Continue reading

 

The Government and The Tryggvasons

What’s he smoking? Crack! Rob Ford: “Yes, One Day I Do Want To Run For Prime Minister” >http://huff.to/HZDQZY First peek at tomorrow’s Toronto Star editorial comic: shared via Meanwhile in Canada -D The facebook inspiration for the below post: Now … Continue reading

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9 Responses to International Women’s Day History: Viking Edition

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