Lizzie Borden

Lizzie Borden with an axe

Hit her father with 40 whacks

when she saw what she had done

she hit her mother with 41

 

 

Back in 1980, in grade 8 acting class, we were assigned to memorize any poem of at least 8 lines.

 

My Dad told me the Lizzie Borden one and this one:

 

Billy, in one of his nice new sashes

Fell in the fire and burnt to ashes

Now, although the room grows chilly

I haven’t the heart to poke poor Billy.

Lizzie Borden

Lizzie Borden

 

Lizzie Borden was one of the first people I search for in the early days of the internet.

Calamity Jane and Annie Oakley too… cowgirls and women pirates and warriors

 

partly from my interests and hobbies, partly from my being a writer, partly plain curiosity to learn more and more and fewer and fewer topics really.

…the nature of escapism and the need to create escapes…

 

One of the more interesting ideas that that Lizzie was a lesbian and killed her Step-Mother when she discovered Lizzie and the maid in bed.

Lizzie then had to kill her father to get away with the first impulsive murder – probably done in the nude – thus – no blood on her clothes.

Blaming a drifter was more comfortable to people than blaming her.

In later life, Lizzie’s younger sister moved out after an actress of the day who’s name I used to remember stayed for a while. the sister’s refusal to explain really said it all.

 

Watching more recent ghost hunter shows trying to pass off obvious and clumsy hoaxes as ghosts in the house gives an interesting look at how close quarters those old homes were.

 

There are parts to stories, no matter how famous or infamous, that we will just never know, because the people involved did not care to share the details and particulars out of self interest and social norms and conventions.

 

But how did we go from being scandalized and titillated by what used to be a rare event – multiple or mass killing events – to these being on almost news media par with car accidents.

 

part of the problem of media is that it not only creates copy cats, but competition between would be mass or serial killers.

 

A person on the verge of committing atrocities is often inspired to do better than the one before. and it’s almost like a pressure wave of permission, in the same way that suicide contagion works in small communities of teenagers seeing how much caring the suicide before them got….

 

 

I think about the Norway shooter and how long it took for the media to catch up with that he was not crazy, he was too organized and goal oriented – what they couldn’t emotionally understand was the why.

 

The logic was impeccable. To attack the immigrant population would gain them sympathy, so he chose a path of terror against those who support multiculturalism. To punish them for the transgressions he thought them guilty of.

 

But all he really did was reinforce what a problem that deeply held religious convictions are.

 

It has been the most frustrating things for me to deal with the mental health industry that basically treats artistic ability as a mental health problem

 

while ignoring that religion meets the diagnostic meaning of delusion

 

people who are not grounded in reality should not be in a position to legislate it for the rest of us

 

and we need to deal with mental health to make individuals stop thinking that they are vigilantes for deities and carrying out the orders of invisible sky daddies

 

 

we need to stop giving religion a free ride from evaluation and criticism

 

because that’s why we keep repeating history

 

religion is the ultimate OCD of doing the same thing and expecting a different result

 

when Christianity was in charge in Europe, it was called the Dark Ages

 

Enlightenment – art meets science – in the study of nature – the environment and ourselves

 

 

religion is about group conformity

spirituality is about individual growth and continual self improvement

 

one is not sustainable and I think everyone can do the math on that one.

 

 

 

 

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