Being Elvis …

The reason there’s so many cancer deaths now

is partly because of living in an industrialized world

****(85% of cancers are environmental)****

but the other reason is BECAUSE OF VACCINES

eliminating contagious illnesses that killed us before we got old enough to get cancer

HERD IMMUNITY is only effective when everyone is treated

yes, there will be people who have adverse effects, including death

however, there is NO CONNECTION between vaccines and autism.

the single study that made that claim, bypassed peer review and was paid for by an anti-vaxxer group.

the doctor who conducted the study has had his license taken away and is not in any medical field where he can do any more harm

correlation is not causation

that it runs in families is a genetic clue

but part of it is that we are creating pathologies to explain behaviors rather than dealing with them

and working within a spectrum or syndrome allow for slippery slope and sloppy diagnosis applied with personal bias rather than objective measurable

the brain is the most complex part of the body and is the most complex computer that is manufactured by largely unskilled labour

anyway

enough soap box and soap opera

it’s funny to me that Elvis was called so many terrible things and accused of corrupting the youth of America….

let’s see

He paid his full taxes without sheltering anything
He served in the military without complaint about his career disruption
He supported so many charities (without taking tax deductions)
and
the phrase most associated with him is

Thank You Thank You Very Much

 

Elvis nation

creating homogenous ghettos

this is why history repeats

cowards retreat until they are vicious and angry enough to lash out

because they fear being no better than anyone else

your worth is connected to what you contribute

not by how much you consume

 

 

 

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5 Responses to Being Elvis …

  1. jumeirajames says:

    There so much in this post I want to respond to, but I’ll keep it down to two topics.

    1. I had cancer of the tongue (the cancer that grows out of the side of your neck) but I never smoked and won’t even go into a bar of cafe that isn’t smoke free. There is no history in my family of cancer. Sometime people just ‘get cancer’ against all odds.

    2. Elvis. All through my life I never cared for him. I saw him as a swaggering, annoying person (Think ‘Viva Las Vegas’). Then one night I was in a bar, alone and far from home and someone put ‘Are You Lonesome Tonight’ on the juke-box and everything changed. I could hear the raw emotion and for the first time I actually listened to his amazing voice. In another era and another life he could have sung opera. He was that good.
    I still hate all that nonsense that followed him around, the Las Vegas crowd, the manipulation by his agent, the glam rock stuff. But I appreciate him for what he was, a great singer.
    I didn’t know about him paying his taxes in full and so on – it only builds my respect for him.

    Great post.

    Like

    • dykewriter says:

      Thanks

      Elvis did support a lot of charities and individuals very quietly

      characters in movies shouldn’t be confused with the actor

      for years. I couldn’t bear to see Meryl Streep because of Kramer vs Kramer

      Like

      • jumeirajames says:

        I agree but movies and the like build up a picture in people’s minds and it is hard to separate the facts from the fiction.
        In the end Elvis was a singer and he has to be measured and judged on that – his voice and the delivery. He was an exceptional singer and that’s all there is to know and like about the man.

        Like

      • dykewriter says:

        oh, there’s much more to Elvis tban just a voice

        there’s something for everyone

        it’s why he’s such a great metaphor

        Like

      • jumeirajames says:

        You’re right – he’s an icon of the 20th Century

        Like

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